Member Organization Events

Member Organization Events

Monday, March 6, 7 PM, Eliot Chapel, 1st Unitarian Church, SW 12th and Salmon, Portland

Big Farms Make Big Flu -
Dispatches On Infectious Disease, Agribusiness, And The Nature of Science

In BIG FARMS MAKE BIG FLU, a collection of dispatches by turns harrowing and thought-provoking, Wallace tracks the ways influenza and other pathogens emerge from an agriculture controlled by multinational corporations. Wallace details, with a precise and radical wit, the latest in the science of agricultural epidemiology, while at the same time juxtaposing ghastly phenomena such as attempts at producing featherless chickens, microbial time travel, and neoliberal Ebola. Wallace also offers sensible alternatives to lethal agribusiness. Some, such as farming cooperatives, integrated pathogen management, and mixed crop-livestock systems, are already in practice off the agribusiness grid.

While many books cover facets of food or outbreaks, Wallace's collection appears the first to explore infectious disease, agriculture, economics and the nature of science together. BIG FARMS MAKE BIG FLU integrates the political economies of disease and science to derive a new understanding of the evolution of infections. Highly capitalized agriculture may be farming pathogens as much as chickens or corn.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Rob Wallace is an evolutionary biologist and public health phylogeographer. He is a visiting scholar at the Institute for Global Studies at the University of Minnesota and an advisor to the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy. He has consulted for the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on avian influenza. He is previously a co-author of FARMING HUMAN PATHOGENS: ECOLOGICAL RESILIENCE AND EVOLUTIONARY PROCESS

Date/Time:  Monday, March 6,  2017.  Doors open at 6:30; event starts at 7 PM.
Location:  Eliot Chapel, First Unitarian Church, SW 12th and Salmon
Admission:  Donation requested: $5-20; however, no one will be turned away for lack of funds.

 


Sunday, March 19, 7 PM, Eliot Chapel, 1st Unitarian Church, SW 12th and Salmon, Portland

Refinery Town -
Big Oil, Big Money, and The Remaking of an American city

Meet and talk with author Steve Early

The People vs. Big Oil—how a working-class company town harnessed the power of local politics
to reclaim their community

 

Home to one of the largest oil refineries in the state, Richmond, California, was once a typical company town, dominated by Chevron. This largely nonwhite, working-class city of one hundred thousand suffered from poverty, pollution, and poorly funded public services. It had one of the highest homicide rates per capita in the country and a jobless rate twice the national average.

But in 2012, when veteran labor reporter Steve Early moved from New England to Richmond, he discovered a city struggling to remake itself. In Refinery Town, Early chronicles the fifteen years of successful community organizing that raised the local minimum wage, defeated a casino development project, challenged home foreclosures and evictions, and sought fair taxation of Big Oil. Here we meet a dynamic cast of characters—from ninety-four-year-old Betty Reid Soskin, the country’s oldest full-time national park ranger and witness to Richmond’s complex history; to Gayle McLaughlin, the Green mayor who challenged Chevron and won; to police chief Chris Magnus, who brought community policing to Richmond and is now one of America’s leading public safety reformers. Part urban history, part call to action, Refinery Town shows how concerned citizens can harness the power of local politics to reclaim their community and make municipal government a source of much-needed policy innovation.

Date/Time:  Sunday, March 19,  2017.  Doors open at 6:30; event starts at 7 PM.
Location:  Eliot Chapel, First Unitarian Church, SW 12th and Salmon
Admission:  Donation requested: $5-20; however, no one will be turned away for lack of fund